VCC 2018 Educational Technology Showcase – May 24, 2018

On May 24, 2018, Vancouver Community College was pleased to present our fourth annual Educational Technology showcase: “The Future Now”.

Held at the VCC Downtown campus, this day-long event gave our Faculty an opportunity to showcase educational technologies, best practices, and to learn from their VCC colleagues.

The Showcase was located in and around Room 420 of the Downtown campus, and encompassed over eleven presentations over six hours. You can see this year’s list of VCC EdTech Speakers and Sessions, and check out the event’s tweets at the hashtag #vccedtech

Here are descriptions, videos and resources from the day’s presentations:


Vis Naidoo, Chief Educational Technologist, Cell-Ed

Vis Naidoo presented on mobile learning, focusing on language and workforce skills training. View this presentation.

About the Presenter: Vis is the Chief EdTech and Global Officer at Cell-Ed (www.cell-ed.com), playing a leadership role in developing and implementing a strategy to take the use of mobile phones for learning (mlearning) globally. He is also a member of the CARICOM Technical Working Group on Open and Distance Learning (ODL), a Fellow of the Institute for Public Education – British Columbia and Board member of Education
without Borders. Before this, Vis spent much of the past 20 years involved in educational technology policy and applications, ODL systems, organizational development and building partnerships in support of the social and economic development of people and communities. His work in Canada, South Africa and globally spans industry, non-profit organizations, government, governmental agencies, and Education institutions. Vis has served on education Boards in South Africa, Africa, and Canada. He holds a B.Sc., Dip. Ad.Ed, M.Ed. and MBA..


Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Dr. Jhangiani presented KPU’s Zed-Cred program initiative: “What it is, why it’s important, and how they did it”. View this presentation.

About the Presenter: Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani is the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where he conducts research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. A recipient of the Robert E. Knox Master Teacher Award from the University of British Columbia and the Dean of Arts Teaching Excellence award at KPU, Dr. Jhangiani serves as the Senior Open Education Advocacy and Research Fellow with BCcampus, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. Dr. Jhangiani has revised two open textbooks—for Research Methods and Social Psychology—and advocates for the adoption of open educational and science practices. His books include A Compendium of Scales for Use in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2015) and Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science (2017, Ubiquity Press).


Krista Lambert, BC Campus

Krista spoke about using Pressbooks at BCcampus to create and adapt open textbooks and other open education resources (OERs).

Pressbooks allows you to create content once and publish it in many different formats including as a website, PDF document, EPUB document (usable in most e-reading applications and devices), and MOBI (for Kindle specific applications).

Krista demonstrated Pressbooks, how it’s being used to create and edit open textbooks, and how it’s being used in classrooms. View this presentation.

About the Presenter: Krista Lambert is an Open Education Advisor at BCcampus where she coordinates the development of the Zed Cred (zero-cost for students for textbooks) programs.


Lightning Talk Presentations

Inspired by the rapid-fire format of Pecha Kucha, presenters were given a chance to describe their topic in about five minutes. The VCC Library Facebook page has images from this section.

  • Jolene Loveday – Kahoot! and Other Student Response Systems for Formative Assessment (View this presentation.)
    Jolene Loveday is an instructor in the Humanities Department of College
    Foundations, where she teaches university transfer and academic upgrading
    (ABE) English courses. Want to use a game-based app to formatively assess
    student learning in real-time? This short talk will introduce you to Kahoot! and
    other engaging student response systems that are replacing “clickers”.
  • Heather Fouquette & Heather Barclay – Flipgrid (View this presentation.)
    Heather Fouquette is a Blended Learning instructor with the EAL department.
    She is currently teaching an advanced level EAL class in Listening and
    Speaking. Her presentation will demonstrate how to use the application
    Flipgrid for asynchronous video class discussions.
  • Matt Capper – Blockchain (View this presentation.)
  • School of Instructor Education – Student feedback (View this presentation.)
  • Bill Nikolai – Storytelling
    Bill Nikolai is an Instructor/Librarian with a special interest in Learning
    Technologies. In two of several previous lifetimes, he worked as a blacksmith
    and taught English at Japanese universities, respectively.

Janet Latter, VCC Manager, Institutional Research

Topic: Tableau Desktop business intelligence reporting software

Janet described the mission of VCC’s Institutional Research department, and the Tableau data visualization platform. View this presentation.

About the Presenter: Janet Latter is the Manager, Analytics and Business Intelligence in the Institutional Research Office. She began her career at VCC in 1998, working in the Registrar’s Office before moving to Institutional Research in 2003. Working with all aspects of student data using BI tools such as Oracle Discoverer, Cognos and Tableau, she is responsible for creating reports that transform data into information giving insight to enhance and strengthen evidence-based decision-making.


James Fournie, VCC Manager, Institution Research

Topic: Data collection and analysis at VCC Library and Learning Centre

James described how the library collects user and system statistics from numerous sources (databases, websites, computer systems, and even entrance sensors), and uses a variety of methods to analyse, aggregate and report on the data.
View this presentation.

About the Presenter: James Fournie is a Coordinator of Systems and Technical Services for the Library and Learning Centre.


Jane Parker and Margaret Buxton, Instructors, College and Career Access

Topic: Theory and practice behind teaching resistance literature in an
English course

Jane described how her teaching project used online digital sources including video, Prezi, and podcasting to explore issues in student identity and culture in Resistance Literature. View this presentation.

About the Presenters: Jane Parker has been an ABE instructor at VCC for twenty years. In her class of Generation 1.5 ESL/ABE students (who are now Digital Natives), she uses educational technology to increase engagement in practicing editing skills.
Margaret Buxton is an Instructor in College and Career Access at VCC. She is currently
pursuing eLearning Certificate through the School of Instructor Education.


Mari Paz Vera & Elena Kuzmina, VCC Library

Topic: Streaming videos to support lectures and facilitate interaction in
the classroom

Mari Paz and Elena described the various video repositories that are available to Faculty in the VCC Library (Kanopy, Films on Demand, and Curio), and the benefits of using videos in a face-to-face or online classroom, and covered how to find and integrate library video resources into course content. View this presentation.

About the Presenters: Elena Kuzmina is an e-Resources, Collections and Public Services Librarian at VCC. Her experience in academic, special and public libraries has an emphasis on providing equal access and leading change guiding students to become lifelong learners and critical thinkers. She holds a Master of Information and Library Studies from the University of British Columbia and MA in Linguistics from the Kharkov University.
Mari Paz Vera has been a Public Services Librarian at VCC for eleven years and she is
currently the Records Management and Archives Librarian. She holds a Master of
Information and Library Studies from the University of British Columbia and a Master
degree in Management from the University of Bath


Andy Sellwood, Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Research

Topic: Facilitated discussion on the challenges and successes of using Moodle

Andy led a discussion with the attendees to explore their experiences with using the Moodle learning Management system at VCC.  This included successes in areas like video and screencast authoring, high and low-stakes quizzing scenarios, and using questionnaires to simplify student reflection. Challenges that faculty had experienced included finding the time and resources to develop, maintain, or enhance their online courses, keeping their Moodle training up-to-date, improving Student engagement, and finding ways to share authoring experience with other colleagues.
View this presentation.

About the Presenter: Andy Sellwood is an Instructional Associate in the Centre Teaching, Learning, and Research at VCC. Prior to joining CTLR, Andy was a physics instructor and the department leader of Science at VCC between 2010 and 2015. Andy’s interests lie in student motivation, program design and program implementation.


 

Advertisements

ETUG 2015 Spring Workshop

ETUG_Spring_2015_Logo

On June 4th and 5th 2015, members of the Centre for Instructional Development attended the ETUG Spring Workshop at SFU.

ETUG 2015 Spring Workshop, SFU

Here are highlights and observations from the fun and informative presentations:


Day 1

Keynote Address: “Anatomy of 21st Century Educator”

Simon Bates, UBC

In his slide show, Simon described different aspects that make up a 21st Century educator:

  • Teacher for Learning: design effective instructional activities to support active learning
  • Research-based investigation
  • Technology in delivery/assessment
  • Curator (facilitator) of existing resources
  • Collaborator (work wi others; share)
  • Experimenter (how we incorporate new ideas/methods)

Another aspect Simon emphasized was student control in constructing content and context. In contrast to a Learning Management System (like Moodle), which  is an institutionally-controlled learning space, Students could use other online tools, such as PeerWise to collect and curate their own course content.

Peerwise is a course-based question repository, developed by students, that leverages student creativity and collaboration to develop course content. In effect, it is a student-moderated space, and is particularly effective for larger classes. Students can also tag content, creating their own keywords (or use teacher’s own taxonomy).


Basic iPad Training Session for VIU Forestry Students

Michael Paskevicius, Vancouver Island University

Michael’s presentation was a”broad overview of the iPad and basic device management for students entering a program which requires the iPad.”

Preferred Mobile Platform

From the perspective of the project and institution, it was easiest and most practical to support only one brand of mobile device, and the participants were encouraged to buy their own device.

For this project, iPads were selected as the preferred platform to:

  • Reduce textbook purchase costs for students: students will be offered free and/or openly licensed digital textbooks access through the device.
  • Mirror industry standard practices from the field: iPads are emerging as an industry-standard device for the collection of data in the field.
  • Enable collaborative learning in the classroom: allow students to use iPads for group work in class and to share to the projector via AppleTV.

Polling and Quizzing in the Field

Real-time online polling tools (such as Socrative and Polls.io) also played a big role in gathering student feedback and facilitating discussion. QuesTinSitu was used for its geolocationing ability, allowing questions to be asked that relied on knowledge of geography or a physical presence in a particular location.

Mobile let’s students access more text + documents, and easier to transport than many expensive texts.

Additional Resources:


Day 2

Marginalia Annotation Tool

Lannie Kanevsky, SFU
http://www.sfu.ca/education/faculty-profiles/lkanevsky.html

Marginalia is defined as “scribbles, comments and illuminations in the margins of a book.” This old human habit has been found in manuscripts dating back to the 4th Century AD.

Lannie Kanevsky’s Slideshow:
http://scope.bccampus.ca/pluginfile.php/52542/mod_resource/content/1/ETUG%20Marginalia%20Slides%20Kanevsky.pdf

Prior to putting 75% of one of her courses online, Lannie had her students respond to assigned readings in a printed “triple-entry journal” format in order to critically engage them with the texts prior to each class meeting.

Offline, a “Triple entry notebook” can engage students offline, before class so you don’t have to lecture. (Kooy + Kanevsky)

In a Triple-entry Notebook, Students write in margins, working in groups of 3-4, not talking, but interacting by writing in margins of a page of prepared writing.

Lannie resisted pressures to move this process online until she could find a way for students to interact with the assigned readings and each other with the same pedagogical richness and learning outcomes.

This finally became possible when she found Marginalia, a free, friendly, downloadable tool that can be embedded in Moodle discussion forums. It enables students to select portions of a text posted in a discussion forum on a Moodle (a learning management system) and annotate it with their comments appearing in the margin beside the text they’d selected.

As they had in printed responses, active conversations among classmates, the author of the posting and the instructor emerge as others comment on the comments that accumulate in the margins. Lannie demonstrated Marginalia, shared student guidelines for this process, and her students’ work, and encouraged participants to play with Marginalia on their laptops.

Marginalia integrates with the Moodle LMS, and was designed by Jeff Glass with support from BCCampus.

(Note: This tool is Javascript-based, and must be used on a laptop. Unfortunately, touch-based devices such as tablets or smartphones will not work.)


Keynote Address: Exploring Learning Ecologies: Models and Experiences So Far

Paul Hibbitts, SFU

Given that mobile access is now the new baseline, what is the next step for us to help better support our students in this age of networked information?

For Paul Hibbitts it starts with anytime/anywhere access, utilizes a development process where learning and technology are complementary partners, and evolves into the support and creation of learning ecologies. With a learning ecology, learners have an environment and tools to help better foster their own growth and meet their individual needs.

In this discussion-style session, Paul presented a learning + technology development model and a learning ecology framework for group discussion and feedback. He also shared a recent course where he leveraged both of these models as he undertook the creation of a learning ecology for his students.

Paul Hibbitts’ Presentation: 
http://slides.com/paulhibbitts/etug-spring-2015-plenary-keynote-exploring-learning-ecologies/embed

 


More about the ETUG 2015 Spring Workshop:

18303351310_f327d52f4d_k18303380980_e5bb69991d_k

Technology Trends and the Courage to Adapt: CID Learn@Lunch with Tony Bates & Gary Poole

Higher Education Institutions are paradoxical places when it comes to change. On the one hand, they have long-standing traditions dating back centuries. On the other, they are expected to be drivers of innovation, new practices and new thinking. Nowhere is this paradox more clearly demonstrated than in our teaching, where time-honoured practice meet rapid change. This change may be brought on by economic realities, shifts in student characteristics,research on pedagogy, or the introduction of new technologies. Whatever the reason, change can be difficult for those of us who teach in higher education in an era of greater demands to teach effectively.

The technology isn’t letting up. As well as new technologies outside the LMS, such as blogs, wikis, e-portfolios, mobile learning, now LMSes are undergoing some radical changes. What does this mean for the faculty member? In this session, we look at a few of the more significant developments, in particular how some instructors have incorporated some of these technologies, and suggest some simple steps or strategies for instructors to be innovative without getting overwhelmed by the changes in technology.

Put simply, change takes courage — to step outside our comfort zones, to risk the uncertain, and to embrace the unfamiliar with our students. In this April 24, 2012 session, Dr. Bates and Dr. Poole delivered an inspiring and insightful look at how educators and institutions can approach change in constructive and thoughtful ways.

Feel free to download the presentations and recorded videos of this session:

The CID would like to thank Dr. Poole and Dr. Bates, as well as Leva Lee at BCcampus, Jason Toal at SFU, and Grant Potter at UNBC for their support of this event.

TESOL gets Funding from BCCampus

In the 2008 Online Program Development Fund Anita Schuller from TESOL got funding from BCCampus to develop Online Multimedia Resources for TESOL.

TESOL's Anita Schuller

TESOL's Anita Schuller

The end product will be a dynamic, interactive and accessible website containing text, graphics and video links. The videos will consist of four 20-25 minute segments of compressed videofiles in QuickTime or Flash Movies.

This teaching tool will serve as a resource for learners and faculty at Vancouver Community College and other public post secondary institutions offering courses in ESOL teacher training, such as UBC’s English Language Institute and Thompson Rivers University, as well as a professional development resource for the hundreds of BC institutions that provide English as a Second Language classes. Demand for these classes is growing and government funding for adult ESL programs has remained constant or, in many cases, increased in recent years.

Congratulations Anita!